Manual Hippo and Monkey (The Adventures of Hippo and Monkey)

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He had the kind of face which frightened even him when he saw it in a mirror, while the rest of him wasn't very much more beautiful!

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On top of all this, he suffered from hay-fever, and an Awful Desire to Do Good! Mind you, he was an expert at cracking coconuts, if that is, you like licking your coconut milk up off the ground! Hippo and his friends were lucky to have Jungle Doctor to write all their adventures down for us. If you want to know how he solved his problems at last, then start at page one and read on!

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Hippo and Monkey

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We spent the morning dozing on and off instead, listening to the gentle drizzle of rain as it came and went. Gone was the heavy wind driven explosive bouts of rain and hail of the last two days, but with the gentle drizzle came mist and a generally much more subdued mood.

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We ate an early lunch and set off shortly after 1pm. The next three hours were a very cruisey wander through ankle to knee high buttongrassy, heathy low lying stuff typical of the north west, with the odd creek to cross. Fortunately none were of the magnitude of yesterday! The raincoats went on and off more than ever for such a short walk.

The wildlife was just as elusive as the last two days, and we only saw the odd ground parrot, flushed out from their cover when we walked too close for their comfort. The tally for the last two days was something like a few more ground parrots, rosellas, a yabbie, a whistler by sound only , a kangaroo and some kind of bird of prey. Others for the trip would include wedgies, a whip snake, frogs, cicadas, crickets and shrike thrushes.

We then had a lovely entree of biscuits, brie and port while we rejigged our plans to ensure we could still have a crack at all the mountains we wanted to climb. This was our kind of glamping ;! We rejoiced at a brief ray of sun, hoping the fine weather would come in time for tomorrow, and then prepared for an early dinner and even more sleeping. We did a lot of camping in scrub. We were so exhausted after day 2 that we took an easy day and only walked 3 hrs to the foot of Mount Norfolk, instead of attempting West Bluff and Mabel. Today was the day.

Well, it was just another day, but it was the day we would set out to climb the mountain after which the Norfolk range was named, along with Helen Peak. So while this would be one of the shortest distance-wise days of our trip, it was bound to be a big one. We were up and ready to go at 8. There had been a bit of rain overnight so the scrub was nicely damp, but the weather was looking like it might behave. The grey clouds were still hanging around, but there were lighter patches, and even the odd blue bit.

We set off and found an easy way across the river. Then it was up and up. Then John asked for a break at the top of the next rise… We never got there.

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We headed upwards in that fashion until our lead ran out, and once again we were having a bash. We were glad to pop out into waist high tea tree and at least get a sense of where we were. We found the summit by gps, or at least the scrubby patch that marked it. The bigger highlight was heading for the trig point and actually being able to see part of a view!

Even better we had unexpected phone reception, and we sent a few quick messages. Chris might have mentioned scrub that was best tackled walking backwards, and some of the worst bauera you can imagine. While Graham was doing last minute stuff on his phone and John was taking a photo of the trig, I went to scout ahead. You can imagine my surprise and glee, then, when I walked straight onto a cut track. It was the thing of dreams. An hour later we were standing gleefully on Helen, feeling like we owed someone lots of beer.

It was as easy going as you could possibly have had!! The sun came out to celebrate with us, so we hung out all our wet gear while we ate lunch and felt pretty lucky for having such good fortune. We had to choose then between the devil we knew and already had a bashed track up and the chance of an easier route down. We wimped out and went with retracing our steps. When we finally pushed out of the last bit of scrub we enjoyed every moment of the dry, sunny walk down the open ridge. The crickets were out, the sun shone so brightly it hurt to look out to sea where the sun reflected silver off the water, and for the first time the scrub crunched instead of squealched underfoot.

It finally felt like summer!! Back at the tents by and we celebrated with another round of brie and biscuits, accompanied by soup instead of port there was none of that left ;! We were slightly off course from our original plans due to us scratching West Bluff and Mabel on day 3, so we were trying to fit them in slightly differently. Only tomorrow would tell if we had got it right, or been way too ambitious! Day 4 we head up Mt Norfolk.

On the summit we find a slightly more open patch within the trees. We then headed for the trig, not sure we could take a whole heap more scrub to get to Helen. We checked out the route to Helen, and it looked scrubby. Made it much more enjoyable!

And now you see why they call it horizontal. This is a very young example. Just shy of the summit of Helen Peak, the sun came out and we dried off while we ate. We woke to the sound of our alarms, tiredly so given all of us had spent some time during the night listening to the wind roar around us, but only very occasionally buffet our tents.

This was to be another big day — but more so because of the unknown component. If we did, well… we could waste a lot of time and energy and have to turn around before we summited. Never a thought we like to entertain, but always a possibility when walking in unfamiliar territory. And this was very unknown terrain. Maybe today would be the day to really cut our teeth on this walk.


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We were at our planned camp site in just over an hour and got to work setting up our tents. The weather was weird. The clouds were moving from an easterly direction everything so far had been driven from the west and they were bringing with them low mist. It was not the fine and rain free day we were expecting.

As we started up our ridge and entered the cloud, visibility was cut to about 20 metres. It was quite a weird experience, much like the parting of the sea, but we were getting used to that on this walk! We turned right and continued along the ridge, getting ever so close to Mabel, still walking relatively easily, though now having to weave more between thicker, higher scrub and cutting grass clumps. And then the inevitable, we came hard up against a solid wall of tea tree. The fire had only made it so far.

But never mind, almost as if I knew it was there I walked us straight onto yet another cut track. This was becoming more than just coincidental. Does anyone know who was responsible? A North West bushwalking club perhaps? We were certainly very grateful again. In any case, our track took us through some scrub, some lovely forest, and a bit more scrub.

We popped out just before the summit and found a very rusted handsaw hanging from a tree! By now the cloud was breaking up a bit so we had patches of sun in amongst the rolling mist. We then walked back to an open bit with some slightly more extensive views when the cloud allowed.